Battle Report

Masters 2018 Day 2 – ‘Go Big or Go Home’

Last minute addendum: Minutes before I was to publish this Kylie publicly announced she would be stepping down from running Masters and handing the torch over to our own Adam Jenkinson. So I just wanted to take a moment to acknowledge the work that Kylie has done in establishing and running this event over the past 5 years, and the way in which its helped act as a touchstone to keep the national community together. I missed out on the first one but have attended every one since, and without exception they produce heavy competition, great terrain and some of the best missions and tournament structures I’ve had the pleasure of enjoying. There’s now another event I can expect to play you in, I’m sure you will be gaining the title yourself sooner if not later.


Welcome to back to Andrew’s adventures at Masters! If you haven’t already, be sure to go back and read the previous two components to this series for this year. At the end of day one I was staring down the barrel of a very grim position in the standings, but it was a new day. It’d take a little luck and other match ups going my way to reach the podium, but far more than anything it required 3 big wins and nothing less. All the missions today mirror those of yesterday, by some coincidence they were played in the same order. Lets find out how that went shall we?


Game 4 – Pillage and Burn vs Matthew Todd

Azog with The White Warg
4 Hunter Orcs
1 Hunter Orc with 2H weapon
5 Hunter Orcs with Orc bow
1 Hunter Orc with Banner

Fimbul with Fell warg
4 Hunter Orcs
4 Hunter Orcs with Orc bow

Narzug with Fell warg
3 Hunter Orcs
4 Hunter Orcs with Orc bow
1 Hunter Orc with War horn and Orc bow

Yazneg with Fell warg, Lance
3 Hunter Orcs
1 Hunter Orc with 2H weapon
4 Hunter Orcs with Orc bow

Hunter Orc Captain with Fell Warg

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Matt was piloting a list he’d used to great success at Clash earlier this year with the Hunter Orcs. I’m sure he won’t mind me saying their presentation took a slight boost as well as he was borrowing Jeremy’s models. If I wasn’t rotating through the cavalry Hunter Orcs was an army I was considering myself. They can cut through any army like butter with Strength 4 and 2 Attacks on every model. Pitting that against the cloth armour of my army, if I ever got locked down I would be annihilated. If I could get a good round of charges off however, I could potentially do the same with the Serpent Riders charging in with higher fight value, lances and banner support to rip through them. The presence of 5 heroes made me hesitant to consider that plan straight up however, as there was lots of might and fight value kicking around between them. They also had more bowfire than I did. My advantage lay in my mobility and the flying monsters, I had to use it to spread Matt out as much as possible and then hit the more isolated targets.

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We were playing Pillage and Burn, as per the first mission the previous day. I placed two objectives behind the river, which should slow Matt down considerably, and reasoned I was fine with sacrificing one because I could get it back later. I had to spread him out until I found an opportunity to pounce, and that would require some bait.

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The opening went off very smoothly. The Knight of Umbar successfully compelled Narzug (far right above) out of the lines and subsequently eviscerated him turn 1. Matt elected not to send his other heroes in that direction which I though may have been a possibility, keeping them centralised. He wasn’t spreading yet. The rest of my force scooted back slightly, the horses all standing mid stream as we exchanged bowfire. The dice were hot this game, and Hunter Orcs steadily dropped to the poisonous arrows of the raiders

Matt continued to advance onto my objective the following turn and I saw an opening. The Betrayer and Suladan both charged forward, the Betrayer with an excellent hurling line available that would dismount Azog and Yazneg as well dealing considerable damage and preventing Matt from destroying my objective this turn. At the same time, the Knight of Umbar threatened the far flank, and it was very much in my mind at this point that he could simply ignore the fight and fly straight to the back of the board where Matt’s objectives lay.

It was then that the Betrayer would betray me for the 3rd time! He lost combat against a single Hunter Orc, and suddenly the game turns on its head on a single dice roll. Not only are Matt’s heroes still mounted, but he’s taken no casualties, he can destroy the objective this turn and Betrayer is exposed and on his own. I then painstakingly ran through my options, Suladan retreating with his own Heroic Combat, and accepted that the Betrayers fate would come down to a 50-50 Heroic Move contest next turn.

On this occasion, I got lucky, as the dice take so they give. Suladan was forced to dismount to pull off the heroic move, and my might reserves were down to one on both him and the Betrayer, but they got out with their lives.

It was a grim blow, but the Knight of Umbar was still active, and he surged up the flank, demanding a response. Matt diverted some hunter orcs but only one hero to tie him off, and my eyes lit up, as I could potentially isolate and destroy Fimbul like I had Narzug and call a heroic combat off him to fly well beyond reach onto his objectives.

This ploy ended up succeeded, but not without some pure class from Matt. I was just short of killing him and in danger of being locked down, when he unprompted reminded me to roll a hit for thrown rider, which dealt the killing blow. I said it at the time and Matt if you’re reading here it is again, that may have cost you in the match, but you won the real game in that moment.

With that success the Knight of Umbar was free to roam the backboard, looting and pillaging as he went. At the same time I wheeled around my force for a death and glory charge. Either I would burst through and end the game before he could reach my objectives by killing everything, or by losing everything. With the objectives piling up on my side as the Betrayer bailed on the fight to join the Knight, the sooner the game could end the better.

My heroic sacrifice proved enough, and all 6 objectives ended on my side of the board, bought with blood and horse meat. One big win down, two to go. I’d beaten one of my podium picks, and there were more coming in the future.


 

Game 5 Race to the Prize vs David Leonard

Suladȃn the Serpent Lord, Horse (Army Leader) -100
5 Serpent Guards -40
5 Black Númenórean, Venomblade Knights -50
2 Serpent Riders -26 -216 -216

The Betrayer, Fell Beast -170
5 Serpent Guards -40
5 Black Númenóreans, Venomblade Knights -50
1 Haradrim Warrior, Spear and Banner -32
1 Haradrim Warrior, Spear -07 -299 -515

Haradrim Chieftain, Spear -46
12 Haradrim Warriors – Bow -84 -130 -645

Haradrim Chieftain, Spear -46
4 Haradrim Warriors, Bow -28
7 Haradrim Warriors, Spear -49
1 Haradrim Warriors, Spear and Banner -32 -155 -800

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It was time for the Harad civil war! Perhaps a debate over the merits of horses… David had brought a horde harad force, with a monstrous amount of bows and a large body count. Much like Henry’s Gondor, I could not let them get into the center unopposed. Unlike Henry’s army however, David’s didn’t have as many threatening heroes and they were much more lightly armored. His single wraith wouldn’t be able to contend with both of mine if they apprehended it simultaneously.

The deployment for this scenario ultimately played a heavy role in the outcome of this game. I drew upon my Might reserves to ensure that my army came on cohesively, with the exception of Suladan, who was fashionably late (rolled a one two times in a row). I’m a big advocate of the idea that you should be spending as much might as necessary to deploy how you want to. David however opted to split his force, the elites including the Betrayer coming on from the opposite edge whilst the Chieftans entered from my side. I think David’s plan was to get some early rounds of heavy bow fire on me and buy the time necessary to get half of his force on the objective.

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I was more than happy to take this outcome however. It mean I’d be able to take out half his force without much resistant, coming out very much ahead in the trade and not quite break him to risk the game ending, giving me all the time in the world to slam into the second half and cut through and take the objective by killing everything whilst flanking from the sides.

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The bowfire did some damage, but not enough to unduly concern me, and men of Harad began to be knocked down left right and centre from calvary charges and Fell Beast hurls. Over the course of a few turns they were well and truly routed from the field, the chieftains having some magic thrown at them to contain them and allow the slaughter to continue.

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Meanwhile the other half of Davids force was desperately rushing towards the center, but I’d made sure to keep units out of the fight on intercept duty, ready to slow and delay them. A plucky Serpent Rider dismounted and grabbed the artifact from the central objective and even succeeded in killing a Black Numenorean before going down, much to my chagrin. With that model dead, if I killed everything the Chieftans had brought on, David would break and begin to run away, possibly reducing himself to 25% before I could contest the objective. I thus made a very conscious decision to go non lethal with the fellbeast as the only model that could, getting the Betrayer to barge so as to avoid strking blows, leaving a single model shaking his fist as the thunder of hooves faded from his hearing.

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With the line reassembled and feeling confident, the cavalry charged once more into the centre, looking to break the remaining footmen and cause them to flee enmasse. In the final turns, everything was committed, so it came as a great surprise when David was one model from the game ending, that we had a final turn afterwards, because I didn’t kill a single model in around of combat. This led to a most memorable and amusing sequence of events. The Betrayer had spent almost all his will the previous turn killing the Knight of Umbar assuming it was the last turn, so my Suladan called a heroic move intending to charge him and have him fade out of existence by running out of will. Suladan then failed his courage test to charge despite having three will available with a snake eyes, courtesy of the Betrayer’s Harbinger of Evil. My heroic move having failed, David then picks up the dice and makes a courage test for his Betrayer for broken. He fails it by one, courtesy of my own Betrayer’s Harbinger of Evil. In the ultimate fulfillment of his purpose, the Betrayer had now betrayed himself. David opted to take the noble way out and spent his last will to pass that test and then fade out of existence rather than flee the battlefield, granting me the leader kill and prompting more Harad to flee the battlefield, sealing his fate.

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Another big win! At the same time Jeremy had fallen to the hands of Henry, meaning that there was now no one undefeated. I’d have to leave it to fate and Henry’s final opponent to topple him, but with Jeremy losing I felt I had a decent chance of reaching the podium if I could take any kind of win in the last game. A mindset that ultimately, might end up hurting me!


Game 6 – Random Encounter vs Jeremy Shannon

Gundabad Orc Captain with Shield;
8 Gundabad Berserker
1 Gundabad Berserker with Two-handed pick;
3 War Bat

Gundabad Orc Captain with Shield;
4 Gundabad Orc Warrior with Spear; Shield;
5 Gundabad Orc Warrior with Shield;
1 Troll Brute

Gundabad Orc Captain with Shield;
4 Gundabad Orc Warrior with Spear; Shield;
5 Gundabad Orc Warrior with Shield;
1 Gundabad Orc Warrior with Shield; Banner;
1 Gundabad Troll

 

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Jeremys list was unsurprisingly gorgeous, but it had only 3 generic captains for its heroes. I am always in admiration for how he manages to eke the most out of anything that is put in front of him. My missions were to keep my heroes alive, kill his and capture his objectives. What I realized was, with the ability to fire off black darts at his heroes, is that I could do this absolutely no risk and not take fights of any kind. Being so close, I tunneled on purely getting a win to end up on the podium which meant no risk taking and no fighting.

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That doesn’t make for a particularly engaging game, and there isn’t that much to take photos of either. Hence I wasn’t taking many in this final game and there isn’t that much to talk about either. I spent 8 of the 10 turn limit skirting around, shooting bowfire that was predominantly ineffective and firing black darts off at his heroes before Jeremy cunningly concealed them inside a tower I couldn’t reach. With the benefit of hindsight, as soon as the two surviving captains took shelter in the corner, I should have charged straight up the middle to annihilate his army on the objectives as I could get guaranteed heroic moves and charges off every turn and should be able to isolate and take down the rolls. But I did not. I was so afraid of losing I forgot to try and win, which was the opposite of how I’d been playing up until that point. It also wan’t very fun. The Knight of Umbar was in a tentative position at one point and I did commit a charge on the 9th turn, but it was too late for the outcome I was looking for. I took the small win I was guaranteed, knowing it could possibly get me on the podium. It wasn’t a big win though, and thinking back now as I type this the opportunity for one was starting me in the face on turn 6. I didn’t discover until after that game that I was only 10 points behind on the leader board, and in my head as I heard this I knew I’d blown a chance of possibly taking the whole thing!


 

The final podium was :

1. Jeremy

2. Me (!)

3. Henry

I’d come 2nd, and only 5 points behind Jeremy! If I’d been told that on the end of day 1, I’d have been rather cautious about believing it. If I’d been told I’d actually had a chance to win it, I would have hardly believed it. It comes of course, at the cost of my podium predictions, as I’d played and beaten all 3 members featuring on mine. It was not quite the Green Dragon Podcast sweep with my defeat to Kylie,  but it was a respectable haul.

Part of me wishes I could play the last game again, but if wishes were fishes there’d be no room for the water. Best way to learn is to do something wrong. Melbourne ends its title drought, with a hearty congratulations to Jeremy as this years Master, a title well deserved, his involvement in the game is second to none. A thank you also to Joshua for lending me one of his fellbeasts, and to Kylie for a spare magnet when the Betrayer opted to yet again play to the name and lose his. Tim was most generous in hosting Ben and I over the weekend and driving us all over Melbourne, it was most appreciated Tim! Ben unanimously won best sports again (because of course he did, he’s such a swell guy) and we posted something for the first time in a few years (I am such a product of my generation) as we sent home our winnings to avoid extra baggage costs and airport security potentially objecting to pointed trophies.

I was really pleased with the aesthetic of my force in the end as well, my mumaks and remaining infantry are going to get a similar paint job at some point as well. Let this stand as a good example of why you shouldn’t give up after a poor start. Each day and indeed each game is a new one! Ultimately it was close but no cigar, I will be back next year.

hcon

If you’re in Sydney or the surrounding areas, I am running Hobbitcon on the 11th and 12th of August at the Hall of Heroes, Campbelltown. There are single day options if you can’t make both days, and if it’s an incentive given my recent run of form at home you won’t have to play me!

Thanks for reading!

Andrew C

 

 

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Hobby Machine’s Courage of Numenor blog

Or, How to Call a Bluff

Hello everyone! Welcome to my first blog post for the Grey Company. I’ve been meaning to provide a recap of Clash of the Titans from February, however, due to a lack of recording the results of my games, a hazy day 2 thanks to the Baron*, and more projects popping up, I … well, … haven’t.

Quick introduction, I am Hobby Machine, I have been playing the Lord of the Rings Strategy Battle Game – and its Hobbit successor – since 2002. I only got into the tournament scene fairly recently and have enjoyed decent success on the hobby side of things, winning Best Painted in Courage of Numenor, Mother of all Battles (MOAB), Hobbitcon and three of my last four Clash of the Titans events (and coming 2nd to Jeremy Shannon in my first ever Clash ’14). I earned the nickname after working on several armies at once, and presenting them in custom display boards.

What I love most about this hobby is the feeling of taking an existing force or faction, and making them yours through conversions, force organisation or just a unique paint scheme. Each army I put on the table – no matter that faction – has a story, and through similar conversion techniques and shared paint recipes (for universal things like human flesh, silver armour, etc.) can be identified as mine. Normally, my armies can be identified from a group by asking a very simple question, “Is there a Gondor force?”

Courage of Numenor

Courage of Numenor is a single-day 400 point tournament for Middle Earth Strategy Battle Game (as it shall soon be christened) held once a year in the South West region of Sydney. The low points cost is a boon not only to hobbyists wanting to start a new force (or adapt to a new style of play), but also to those who don’t want to worry about their enemy plopping down a dirty great big red dragon in front of them. It’s also a great tournament to try out new scenarios or amendments to the “Standard Six”.

For this occasion, I wanted to challenge myself. Last year I went with a Gondor infantry horde list, with Denethor, Beregond and Damrod leading as many warriors as I could muster. I quickly found out that the lack of Might on the board meant that I was losing priority/first move to cavalry elements and getting out manoeuvred and run down, or enemy heroes who were much better than fighting than a Ranger, a Guard of the Citadel or a mentally unstable geriatric would quickly mince through my shield walls. Time for something new.

Our very own Andrew Colman is on a hot streak of running all-mounted lists, and running them very well (as chronicled here) so I decided to run an all-mounted Gondor list! Now, I’ve never played an all-mounted list before, but I am always up for a challenge, so I immediately thought of a list that would combine everything great about Gondor into 400 points.

Step 1 – Leader. Ever since 1995 I have had a favourite actor. Ever since 2000 I have had a favourite book series, and a favourite book within that series, and within that book I have had a favourite character. When I found out that my favourite actor was playing my favourite character in the film adaptation of my favourite series I was overjoyed. Later, when I discovered this hobby and began to play with the figures, I found that the games designers had translated that character into one of the most powerful heroes of the game, with a special piece of equipment that combined with his stats made him a beast of a unit. Gondor’s first son, Boromir. I have played him in almost every iteration and possible equipment combination. All except one. At such a low points cost, I need a hero that can be both aggressive and supportive, to make sure that my small number of units can stay in the fight and bring their lances to bear upon the foe. I need him to bring his fancy tablecloth.

Step 2 – Theme. Even more important to me because it influences not only my force selection, but the paint scheme and conversion bits as well. I decided that this unit was going to be Boromir’s veterans and his bodyguards. Each Knight was going to have a shield that matched Boromir’s from the Fellowship of the Ring.

Step 3 – Warriors. As I’m going all-mounted Gondor, my force selection is rather limited. My troop options are Knights of Minas Tirith and giving Citadel Guards horses. I decided to go with a roughly even mix of the two, with the front line of five Knights backed up by 5 Guards with spears on horse. I threw three Longbows in there as well for objective-based scenarios and for getting horses out from under heroes.

Mustering the Force

Now that I have a theme in my head, it’s time to gather the pieces together. Thankfully, the wonderful plastic kits make conversions a dream. I had converted some mounted Citadel Guards with Longbows in the past, so I simply repeated the process here.

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Mounted Citadel Guards with (L to R): Longbow and Spear x2, Spear x3

For the Longbow-armed Guard, I used Warrior of Minas Tirith bowmen and Knights of Minas Tirith, I cut both models at the belt and glued the bowman to the Knight’s legs. For the more complicated poses of bowmen where the bow is attached to the legs, I cut the bow off at the wrist, and attached a clean one from another model once I’d joined the torso to the legs. The spear armed Citadel Guard were even easier, just attaching a Warrior of Minas Tirith spearman arm (that come separately anyway) to the body of a Knight of Minas Tirith (who don’t have their weapon arm attached).

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The cloaks were the tricky bits. With the exception of the leftmost Guard, all of them were done using the Hobby Machine Super Glue Method™. First, assemble the model as usual, then trace a cloak from a foot Guard model onto artists paper to get the size right. Then cut them all out and soak them in water so that they will be very flexible and be able to make the same of flowing fabric. Then glue the cloak to the model using superglue. While it is there, push it to shape, then – stay with me here – coat the entire cloak in superglue. Not too thick or it will form drops at the ends, but enough to cover the surface of the cloak. Once this dries, it will harden the paper, sealing in the shape and making the actual sculpting process easier.

Once the cloaks are completely dry, you can start putting green stuff (or your preferred modelling putty) on and start sculpting. I started with the upper portion of the cloaks, to help keep the cloak attached to the model and covering the seam where the paper leads onto the model itself. When sculpting cloaks it’s important to remember how the folds bunch up tightly near the shoulders, and then open up wider near the bottom. Think of them as giant M’s. The tool I use is a metal kitchen skewer, and the best advice I can give you is to be patient, remember you can always add to the green stuff – it’s much harder to remove excess once it’s cured, and always wet your sculpting tools. Nothing worse than dragging the putty and causing tears in your cloth (unless you’re making orc tunics, in which case, go for it but you’re going to have a bad time getting green stuff off your tools).

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The full force, assembly in progress. An example of my previous Mounted Citadel Guard is in the back row

The Knights were relatively simple conversions, I simply used Instant Mold to press-mold Fellowship Boromir’s iconic shield. Since I am left-handed, I wanted to include a left-handed conversion. I took a Warrior of Minas Tirith bowman, did a torso swap like with the Citadel Guard, then cut and turned the head to be facing the other direction, repositioned the right arm (which was the ‘released arrow’ pose) to be carrying a shield and added a lance where the bow was. Done.

And now that the warriors were assembled, I could treat myself to Big Bad Bozza’s conversion. When he carries the Banner of Minas Tirith, he doesn’t receive any defensive bonus from carrying a shield, so I went through the process of removing the shield – and left arm – from the foot model. Thankfully, Boromir, Captain of the White Tower is resin so the process is much easier than if it would have been in metal. I cut away the shield, Horn of Gondor and left arm from the shoulder plates down using clippers (be very careful with resin. Clippers can remove more than you intended and can send very sharp fragments flying at you. Safety first at all times, goggles minimum) and a stanley knife. I then carefully carved off the cord that the horn was attached to. Then I carved the resin around the breastplate on his left side, and his tunic.

Whenever I put Boromir on the table, I want to make sure he bears as close a resemblance to Sean Bean as possible. That means using the best sculpt of Boromir in terms of actor likeness, Fellowship Boromir. I cut off the head and the horn arm from Fellowship Boromir on foot, and attached them to the resin model. Pinning is a great idea, but not necessary for these areas.

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Assembling the foot model. Something’s missing…

Since the spare Banner of Minas Tirith I had was metal, that definitely needed to be pinned, so using a spare outstretched Knight of Minas Tirith banner arm, I pinned both it and the banner to Boromir. I also wanted to fix the triple-jointed banner arm that the mounted model has. That was a bit more involved. I used the Mounted Banner Bearer of Minas Tirith’s right arm, cutting off the banner (but still leaving it attached to the model’s head) and using pliers, crushing the remaining pole bit above the hand into a pin shape, to sit the resin banner on top.

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The banner on the mounted Boromir is just dry-fitted at this stage

I made sure not to glue the banner to Boromir until after I had finished painting both. At this stage, the assembly is complete!

Painting the Army

This army was going to be something special, and needed a fittingly special paint scheme. You might be curious as to why I sub-titled this article How to Call a Bluff. A fellow hobbyist, Michael, had been singing the praises of transfers/decals after a very successful Adepticon in the United States where he walked away with the Best Painted award for his 30K Ultramarines. He and I were getting into a friendly banter about what was better, freehand or transfers, so I told him I was going to put my money where my mouth was and feature freehand extensively in my force. Thankfully, the Banner of Minas Tirith is going to be a fine centrepiece to my army, and I made sure to include as many freehand details on each model as possible.

My plan was, since it was called the Banner of Minas Tirith, it needed to feature Minas Tirith on it! It just makes sense. So, what I did was trace around the banner onto a piece of paper, then after looking through Google Images for a picture of Minas Tirith, copied the outline of the city onto the paper to get the right scale before painting the mini itself.

There’s a great article in the old White Dwarf issue 362 where it shows you a few techniques to get great freehand, and those tips are what I put into practice with painting the freehand on this force.

  • Always thin your paints, it makes linework so much easier and if you need to fill in an area, use multiple thin coats
  • When painting in freehand, always plan it out on paper first, you’ll save yourself a lot of headaches later.
  • If your design is complex, us a series of dots on the extremities of the design to help you map out the shape, then simply paint the points onto the miniature and join the dots.
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All the detail on the banner is freehand, that should settle the bet!

I paid particular attention to the horses in this force as well, since it was my first all-mounted list and horses are a big part of that. I loved researching the different breeds of horse, the markings, mane colours and patterns, etc. Taking that little bit of extra care with the horses really helps add to the look of the overall model.

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With each Knight’s pennant, I took care to make them mini Banners of Minas Tirith, giving them the same colour palette and adding the same freehand pattern that is on the banner itself. (I don’t know what the pointy bits of the Banner of Minas Tirith are called.) I also painted a pair of sea bird wings on the shields for another focal point.

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Here are some photos of the finished army in action on the day. My results were 2-2, which I’m not unhappy with, considering it was my first time taking all-cav. Against Andreas’s Gondor infantry horde, I fared rather poorly, and my dice rolls weren’t very helpful. Still, with Hobbitcon around the corner I have plenty of time to get more practice games in and maybe someday even be as good as Master Colman! (yeah right)

Also as a bonus, I took home Best Painted! So many wonderful forces there including Andrew’s all-mounted Harad, Andreas’ red Gondor force and Eric’s four-clan Khand chariots.

 

 

 

*Baron in this case being the main ingredient by volume of the drinks I was being served by Bone’ead, one of the original NSW strategy battle gamers, and the Tournament Organiser for Clash of the Titans for many years

There and Back Again: A Masters Tale Part 3

By Andrew Colman

Welcome to the third and final part of my Masters blog! If you haven’t , do read the previous two components I’ve written prior this one for context on what is occurring.  (It would also pad my already enormous ego to have people reading it!).

Day 2: ‘It is close, so close to achieving its goal’

Sunday dawned bright and clear, but still far below a soft Sydneysiders acceptable minimum temperature. A slightly later start time was appreciated for the extra hours’ worth of sleep. I was starting the day in a powerful position at the head of the rankings, but facing the task of maintaining it for the whole day against the top of the field.

I’d like to give a little context on the significance of my match against Locky. For this event we were both members of the Fallen so it was a team kill to start. We’d first met in the final round of Masters last year. In a game that ultimately decided the tournament with us both sitting on 5 wins, I’d secured 1st place by a good 15 point margin whilst knocking him down to 4th denying him almost all points over the course of that encounter. I knew that if I were him I’d be leaping at the chance for a rematch. We narrowly avoided playing each other at Clash, which he ultimately won, being on the top tables next to each other in the final round. There was a distinct feeling in the back of my mind that whoever won this match would have a very good opportunity to go and win the event. No pressure for round 4 out of 6 right?

 

Round 4: Random Encounter vs Lachlan Rigg (Survivors of Laketown)

Warband 1

Bard the Bowman with Armour and Horse (LEADER)

2 Lake-Town Militia with Spear and Shield

2 Lake-Town Militia with Spear and Bow

4 Lake-Town Militia with Shield

1 Lake-Town Militia with Bow

 

Warband 2

Percy

4 Lake-Town Militia with Bow and Spear

6 Lake-Town Militia with Bow

 

Warband 3

Alfrid the Councillor

5 Lake-Town Militia with Spear and Shield

4 Lake-Town Militia with Shield

 

Warband 4

Gandalf the Grey with Horse

5 Lake-Town Militia with Spear and Shield

4 Lake-Town Militia with Shield

 

THRANDUIL’S HALLS

Legolas, Prince of Mirkwood with Horse

IMG_0504[1].JPGAny man who wants to give their last, follow me!

The mission we were playing was Random Encounter. Every player receives a random assortment of 3 out of a 6 possible objectives. Crucially, you do not which objectives your opponent has secured. The opportunity to play mind games with your opponents  was apparent. I indulged in it wholeheartedly, perhaps overindulged as we shall soon see. The 3 objectives I received were:

Bodyguard: Keep my leader alive, have more heroes alive

Capture: Capture my opponents objectives

Destroy: Break my opponent’s army

I was pretty confident that I would be able to fulfill all of my objectives. The scribe and mercenaries gave me a very good opportunity to lockdown the objective points, the Goblin King is very difficult to kill and I had more heroes to start than Locky. Double Monsters hurling through a defense 4 army should be able to do the work they needed to in order to break Locky as well. We were playing on the fantastic Pelagrir board, with lots of cover, ruins, chokepoints and general theme oozing out of every crevice. From a tactical standpoint, it gave me good cover from the nasty volume of bowfire Locky was packing. There were 12 bowman backed up by Percy, alongside the sniper team of Legolas and Bard. Deployment had me placing everything at the back of the board bar the Goblin King’s warband, which meant I had some difficult decisions to make. Ideally most of my army would be towards the front so they wouldn’t have to run the gauntlet of missile fire hailing down from both bridges. But since they weren’t, did I leave the Goblin King to make the trip with them or commit him straight into combat? I ultimately opted for combat, reasoning that should he be at risk I could simply rotate him out reasonably comfortably. It’d also give me the opportunity to mind game him into thinking I didn’t have the Bodyguard objective and potentially reduce the focus that he’d otherwise receive.

IMG_0548[1]Locky assumed a commanding sniper position atop the two bridges

The Goblins all surged forward in a mad dash to spend the least amount of time under the withering hail coming from the the two bridges on overwatch. Grinnah was brought down in an enfilade of fire from Legolas and Bard and the Shaman was left with one wound and no fate, but the rest of the archery was thankfully not as devastating as it could have been with only light to moderate casualties. The Goblin King slammed into the laketowners and throwing bodies left and right. Some plucky goblins opted to jump into the water and attempt to swim under the bridge. A few of the more allergic to washing stumbled and drowned. Meanwhile the scribes reinforcements were beginning to encroach on his position from behind.

IMG_0549[1]The elite goblin Marines dons their scuba gear and jumps into the water.

In the meantime the Dark Marshal and the Black Numenoreans threatened his left flank, causing everyone to withdraw to the bridge and ceding me sole control of 70% of the board. I had control of 3 of the 4 objective markers with an easy access to the final one, an equal hero count and the ability to get into combat and start tearing his troops apart. I was rightfully feeling comfortable about being able to score good points whilst denying him lots of potential objectives. Looking at Locky, it was clear he had realised the same.

But it’s never over until its over.

IMG_0550[1]A truly beautiful board.

The Goblin King stood in a chokehold only allowing a single model to fight him at a time, and he had slaughtered his way through a total of 8 milita thus far. Locky then opted to charge him with Gandalf, hoping to damage him with Orcrist as it ignores his blubber save. Thematic, but somewhat risky because of his lower attacks and fight value, in addition to being potentially annihilated himself should he lose a fight. It paid very heavy dividends however, as over 2 turns from 4 attacks he successfully dealt 4 wounds and slew the Goblin King outright. The unexpected speed in which he was vanquished took me completely aback and gave no opportunity to withdraw him as I had initially envisioned. It was an undesirable setback, denying me lots of vps  and slowing my killing capacity, but I still held a controlled position. Locky was tunneling hard on his archers dealing out damage, which allowed the Dark Marshal to swoop in over two turns and hurl them pell mell across the bridge. I made another crucial mistake in overestimating where my mercenaries could deploy and holding them back for far too long, and immediately realised they would pay no part in the battle. They were another part of the mind games I had been playing with Locky, and while that had certainly served its purpose in demoralizing him into a losing position, they now weren’t going to be able to anything to help me win! It was at this point I realised that I was letting the game slip away from me, when I by all rights should have been simply playing it out for a comfortable win.

IMG_0553[1]Defeat from the jaws of victory?

It was now crucial that I break Locky before the game ended to secure the victory and a clean 8 VPs to tie the game up irrespective of his objectives. The Dark Marshal flew into the midst of his army looking to seal the deal whilst the goblins closed in on all sides. The Dark Marshal did minimal damage on impact before being swarmed in the final turn of the game and slain. As the dust settled, I was a heartbreaking one model short of breaking him. One model denied me a full 8vps and rendered it 0. Losing the Goblin King had caused me to lose heavy VPs, and the loss of the Dark Marshal at the death meant that because Locky also had the Bodyguard objective, he had more heroes alive and could turn it from a 6-5 to me to a final result of 8-6 in his favor. I’d gotten into his head and Locky fully believed he had lost the match even as it ended, even as we were counting up the points. My mind games had been flawless, successful to a fault, ending up in some measure into tricking Locky into winning. The look of surprise on his face when he realised he’d actually won was priceless. By the end we’d gathered a decent crowd of spectators around the table in what was dubbed the match of the tournament, I’m sure it was a most entertaining game to watch.

As I look back at this game, there are multiple  errors I made. Splitting my force, losing the Goblin King, wasting my time with the Black Numenoreans and Dark Marshal and holding back the mercenaries for far far too long. I still back my decision to commit the Dark Marshal at the death, taking a 6 point win was far too much of a risk for the overall tournament standard, and even with a mediocre finish from me Locky had made mistakes as well, I was still heartbreakingly close to the break and the win, a single defense 4 model lay between victory and defeat across multiple combats.

Unfortunately you can’t win them all. With the advantages I created and the subsequent volume of errors I made when it mattered, I didn’t deserve the win. Far better to lose and learn from your mistakes than win and fail to recognise them. Good advice for life in general!

Final Score: 6-8

 

Round 5: Clash of Champions vs Liam Daily (Moria)

Warband 1

Durbûrz, the Goblin King of Moria

4 Moria Goblin Warrior with Shield;

3 Moria Goblin Warrior with Spear;

2 Warg Marauder

 

Warband 2

Moria Goblin Shaman

4 Moria Goblin Warrior with Shield;

3 Moria Goblin Warrior with Spear;

1 Warg Marauder

 

Warband 3

Grôblog

4 Moria Goblin Warrior with Shield;

3 Moria Goblin Warrior with Spear;

1 Warg Marauder

 

Warband 4

Moria Goblin Shaman

4 Moria Goblin Warrior with Shield;

3 Moria Goblin Warrior with Spear;

3 Moria Goblin Warrior with Orc bow;

 

Warband 5

The Watcher in the Water

IMG_0499[1]Who ordered seafood?

I was quietly disappointed after the result of the last game as I knew it was a powerful opportunity to retain my position on the top of the table. Regardless, winning the final two games should put me in good stead for contention should I pull it off.

Round 5 I was playing against my travelling companion Liam, the final member of the Fallen, meaning I had now had to play against all 3 of my teammates (a testament to the quality of our team that we were all at the top!). Liam and I had spent a fair amount of time discussing strategies in the days prior and I was quietly confident he was going to be a dangerous contender for the top echelons. We’d practiced against each other, so we had a fairly intimate knowledge of how the other persons

We were playing Clash of Champions, which is all about getting kills on your leader, and generally slaughtering your opponent. Liam’s Watcher wasn’t his starting leader, but there was always a chance he would drown Durburz. Even he didn’t, there was a severe danger he would simply snatch up Goblins and deliver them to Durburz on a silver platter. It was also very obvious that he would deploy on the river for the Watchers benefit, as with my lack of shooting I would have to approach him.

Accordingly, we deployed some distance apart in a manner reminiscent of a mexican standoff. I didn’t want to commit and have my champion snatched off by Mr Tentacles to be tied up for the entire game without any prior opportunities to get rid of all the will on his shamans and heroes, whilst Liam didn’t want to face my combat nasties and take the opportunity to shoot whilst he could. A cagey start saw us maneuvering for position, as I tried to stay out of Watcher range whilst throwing off sap wills left and right.

IMG_0555[1]A 6×4 board and we end up on a 2×2 square!

I forced Liams hand with a humble goblin, travelling at Mach 3. The Goblin King successfully killed a Moria Goblin with a thrown Goblintown minion, forcing Liam to engage else he lose outright. I was so tunneled on the Watcher’s movement within the water (which doubles it from 4 inches to 8) that Liam’s decision to take him out of the water took me aback. He swarmed up, threatening to grab the Dark Marshal.

This prompted a truly unique and memorable passage of play. The Goblin King remained stationary and prepared to throw another Goblin. Thrown Goblins knock enemy models to the ground, thus if I could hit the Watcher he couldn’t use his tentacles, which are a shooting attack. Liam calls a heroic shoot, fully aware of what I intend and looking to strike first. I called a heroic shoot in response. A few judicious might later, I win the roll off, successfully hit the watcher and knock it to the ground, preventing it from shooting, and crucially limiting it to a 2 inch move the next turn! This then lead to a massed heroic combat/strike the next turn, with the hapless watcher swarmed and brought down by the King, bringing his kill count to 2. To cap it off, as Liam realises Durburz will never now reach combat, he makes the noble sacrifice of drowning himself in the river, using might to move down the result and give himself a new champion! One of the more ridiculous passages of play I’ve witnessed in recent memory, yet one that made complete tactical sense at all stages.

IMG_0558[1]The Watcher in the Water is filleted for sushi like a fish out of water

At the same time on the other flank, Liam surges into the fray as he desperately tries to secure kills on Groblog, his new champion and use his marauders to run down my goblins. My Black Numenoreans were crucial in getting the fight value to prevent them from rampaging and locking them down. Groblog successfully gets 1 kill, before the Dark Marshal swoops in to immbolise him for the rest of the game. I was fortunate that he would fail to resist the first spell, which made me reasonably confident that I could keep him down and take the game, it was just a question of by what margin.

IMG_0559[1]Thrown Goblins were the clear MVP of this match

The Goblin King waded through the river as Liam came close to breaking. The Moria goblins clung together as the encroaching swarm of their brethren came in from all sides. As the game was coming to a close, Liam consciously stayed as from the Goblin King as possible. Knowing that he would be unable to reach combat, on the last turn he readied his throwing arm for one last throw. He hit, and slew another Goblin, bringing his total to 3, breaking Liam and making my champion kills greater than double his, for a slough of victory points for me in the dying moments of the game. Liam was a difficult opponent who’s getting very good at the game, and I think he’s going to be making waves in the events he attends here in Sydney in the coming months.

Final Score: 16-4

 

Round 6: Seize and Control vs Matthew Todd(High Elves)

Gil-galad on armoured horse w/shield (Leader)

4 High Elves w/elven blade

4 King’s Guard w/spear and shield

1 High Elf w/banner, spear and shield

3 High Elves w/elven bow

 

Elladan (warband leader) and Elrohir

3 High Elves w/elven blade

4 King’s Guard w/spear and shield

3 High Elves w/elven bow

 

Arwen

3 High Elves w/elven blade

3 King’s Guard w/spear and shield

4 High Elves w/elf bow

1 High Elf w/elven blade and elf bow

IMG_0492[1]

Gil-galad was an Elven-king.
Of him the harpers sadly sing;
the last whose realm was fair and free
between the Mountains and the Sea.

His sword was long, his lance was keen.
His shining helm afar was seen;
the countless stars of heaven’s field
were mirrored in his silver shield.

But long ago he rode away,
and where he dwelleth none can say;
for into darkness fell his star
in Mordor where the shadows are.

Mr Todd is a member of the Green Dragon Podcast and a true tournament veteran. I’d predicted him for 3rd place in preamble to the event. It seemed I would need to prove my own prediction wrong if I wanted to place myself! The final round promised for a truly interesting finale. Matt had been on a supreme high of confidence after day 1 with 3 wins which continued into round 4 with a massive win at the same time myself and Locky sunk each other in points. He’d been promptly brought back down to earth with a thorough trouncing from Locky in round 5. Liam was playing Locky and our hopes rested with him to tie him down (he received a barrage of advice from us). Were that to be the case, there was a field of 4 or 5 of us in contention for 1st place. It was time to play for all the marbles. We were playing Seize and Control, effectively Domination. Understandably my focus was intent on the match at hand, so there’s an unfortunate dearth of photos for this particular game, I only took a couple at the end. I will endevour to make this an appealing chunk of text!

My list does exceptionally well at Domination being able to capture all the objectives simultaneously.  We were playing on a heavily forested board, which would favor Matts elves. He also had lots of Kingsguard, of which the Fight 6 would be heavily nullifying the power of my 2 monsters in combination with elven blades. I was fully prepared to heroic strike to be able kill the models I needed to. The match started with Gilgalad storming down a flank, slaying all the goblins in his path. I reasoned it was a reasonable trade to removing him from the primary conflict and keep away from my own hitting power. He would eventually burst through and start hunting down the scribe, who would summon reinforcements to intercept and stall him. In the centre of the board the goblins performed their trademark scuttle towards the waiting ranks of elves. In the meantime Liam had suffered early losses against Locky, but was rapidly coming back into the game for a slight lead. There was everything to play for!

It was at this point that one of the unfortunate realities of a dice game struck. I failed to cast fury two turns in a row on the roll of a one. I wasn’t channeling either so that I could retain the might to ensure it went off. A 1/36 chance that was going to severely punish me in the end game. The shaman enabled my horde to stick around, and if I were to position it in the center of the board, it could daisy chain stand fasts for all my heroes to subsequently cover the entire area around the central 3 objectives whilst the mercenaries secured another. It’d allow me to snowball my numerical advantage for the games entirety. My heart sunk when I saw this, because I knew it was going to make the game much harder and I had really overwhelm the elves, and quickly. If I was broken before the end was nigh, I was most likely now going to lose.

With some moderate casualties from bowfire, the goblins ran into combat. It is at this point I make a very foolish error. I commit the Dark Marshal to the wrong elf, so that he would be in range of a heroic combat slingshot from the twins. I was even conscious of this possibility, and was looking at a different target for him. Yet I still made the mistake. A moment of carelessness, perhaps the pressure brought on by losing my late game safety in the shaman or a touch of fatigue? Irrespective of the reason, it would prove costly. Matt still needed things to go his way because I had several mitigating tools, but full credit to him, he took the opportunity with both hands, and the Twins successfully brought down the Dark Marshal. My late game was looking even more grim now without a high courage hero and one of my major kill threats. Arwen was unable to cast natures wrath, I was fortunate to be able to resist all its casts with a couple of might to assist. One of the Twins was slain in the continuing melee, alongside a steady grind of elves and goblins. My scribe reinforcements were somewhat underwhelming on the whole this game,  and some of those that did come on were diverted to prevent Gil Galad from murdering the scribe.

IMG_0561[1]Gilgalad ran out of might and was on a solo mission relatively early in the game, but it did not stop the mighty king leaving a fearsome pile of bodies in his wake.

I then hit the dreaded break point. As I feared, without my safety nets, my army promptly collapsed upon itself. I was forced to bring the mercenaries on into the primary fight to prevent a complete rout rather than securing one of the periphery objectives Matt was looking to contest. The Goblin King fled immediately, and with it most of my hopes of winning. Should he stay around, I had the killing power to continue grinding out the elves. Gilgalad was in the far corner of the board, and if Matt wanted to contest the final objective, he would have to stay there. Unfortunately it was not be, and the elves began to slay the remaining goblins or more commonly, left them to flee en masse.

IMG_0563[1]My blunder combined with the shamans failure had cost me dearly.

As the final goblins were put to the sword, Matt had managed to pull out a respectable if not overwhelming win, but Locky in the meantime had narrowly pulled out the win over Liam. I mentioned it earlier but I have to give recognition to Liam, he did exceptionally well in the face of a very difficult schedule of opponents and pushed both me and Locky hard.

Final Result: 4-14

 

With 6 wins from 6 games, Locky would thus be the Master of Middle Earth for 2017. He would do it playing against the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th place getters. A truly impressive achievement Locky, well done, I am honored to pass on the title!

In what is some true irony, in the reversal of Locky and I’s positions last year, I would finish in 4th place. We’re one to one now, third time takes all?

David Leonard (for the second year in a row!) and Matthew Todd finished in 2nd and 3rd respectively, whilst Liam took 6th. My predictions for the podium in the preamble report I gave before the event proved to be wonderfully accurate, which was pleasing to see. My eye for how people play the game was alive and well! The Fallen would take the team award for the 3rd year at Masters by a decisive margin, despite the substantial volume of team killing we had enacted against each other.

It was a most enjoyable weekend away. I had some commanding wins and some heartbreaking losses. It wasn’t the best I have ever played, but I had a real blast of a time and it was great to see some of our friends from the south again. Goblintown is entering retirement alongside the Rivendell Knights for the forseeable future, however I feel a serious urge to return to my roots in the all cavalry force. I feel its where I best shine as a player, dictating the terms of battle, holding control and never relenting it. At the time of writing, I lead a mounted Gondor force to a tournament win at Courage of Numenor last weekend. I enjoyed a 17 game consecutive winstreak in the wake of my win at Masters last year, so hopefully its a sign that history may repeat itself!

A colossal thank you must go to all my opponents on the weekend, it’s the community that makes the game what it is. A thank you must also go to Kylie for running the event, and to Josh for once again being a most generous host. And lastly, a thank you to you, dear reader, for making it to the end. If you haven’t done it before, come along to an SBG event, you won’t regret it. If you have, I hope to see you at an event soon! I’d be remiss not to promote the next event in Sydney, Hobbitcon, the first weekend of September with one and two day options. I’ll be helping run the event, so if that’s an incentive you won’t have to play me! If you’re not a member, join the Australian LoTR & Hobbit SBG Community , all the details for this and other events are here. If you enjoyed this blog, please comment and let me know if you’d like to see more of this or other things in the future.

Masters will be taking a road trip to Sydney next year, so I’ll be back to reclaim the title!

Thank you for reading! Happy Hobbying!

Andrew

There and Back Again: A Masters Tale Part 2

A Masters report by Andrew Colman

Welcome back to the second part of my blog covering the Australian SBG Masters for 2017. In this part I’ll be covering the group stage on the first day of play. If you haven’t already, go back and peruse the blog entry I composed prior to the weekend, I do a preview of all three of my group stage matches and an in depth discussion of my own list which should give you some good context.

Day 1: The Road Goes Ever On and On

Friday night saw myself and Liam Dailly travelling down from Sydney to Melbourne where we were joined by Lachlan Rigg from WA and hosted by the magnificent Joshua Colman (as his surname would suggest). Together we made up the ‘Fallen’ representatives at Masters under the pseudonym of ‘The Barons’. Saturday morning was a bracing 1 degree above 0 as we plodded around in at least 4 layers. A trend of extremely cold weather seems to hang around the Melbourne events I’ve attended the past few years. Whilst the turnout for this year was a little disappointing, it was great to see both some familiar faces and get the opportunity to meet some new ones. The quality of painting and creativity in display boards made my choice for best army difficult, but I ultimately voted for Tim’s Double Mumak army just ahead of Josh’s Werewolves. Coincidentally, I’d have the pleasure of playing both of these armies on Day 1.

In the interest of assisting those who might be looking to improve their game, throughout my discussion of each of these matches I will try to convey my thought process going into the game, how it plays out and you could possibly learn from it. Before you start each game you need to identify several factors; the strengths and weaknesses of your army, the strengths and weaknesses of your opponents, how they will subsequently interact with each other and the nature of the mission you are playing, and what point in all of the these interactions will yield you the greatest advantage. This is a fairly overt way to articulate it, but everyone who’s ever played a miniatures game will have done this on some level.

Game 1: Supply Lines vs Joshua Colman (Dwellers in the Dark)

Wild Warg Chieftain

9 Dwellers in the Dark

Wolves1They don’t bite…they rend

The supply lines mission revolves around getting points for holding up to 3 objectives in every turn. Josh’s werewolf army was using dweller in the dark profiles, meaning there were 9 monsters with regeneration and higher fight value than my big hitters. I knew if they got into my goblin line they would inflict horrific damage and start a bowling competition with the amount of hurls they would unleash. The mission lay heavily in my favour however as I could easily get to all 3 objectives with superior numbers and quickly gain points Josh had limited mechanisms to answer. He also possessed only a single might point, guaranteeing me the ability to move as and when I needed to. Fury and the high courage of the Numenoreans meant the terror on his models wasn’t a heavy concern, whilst if I beat the werewolves in combat there low defence meant i could return heavy damage on them.  It was the epitomy of a glass cannon. With all these factors in mind, I was cautiously optimistic that if I simply control the game I should come out with a win. We were playing on a beautiful Khand board that drew some inspiration from Japanese aesthetics of our world. The central objective lay just outside a portico style gate in the centre of the board. This created a natural choke point that only one or two wolves could access, so a coterie of goblins proceeded to huddle in its shelter throughout the course of the game hoping they wouldn’t be killed by their hurled brethren. A stone wall run through the board on either side of the gate.

Wolves2The flying Goblin formation (with camera blur)

Hesitant about dividing my army with one half cut off by the wall, I formed a defensive V formation spearheaded upon the gate and prepared to stall out whilst I gained objective points.

My initial manoeuvres made it difficult for Josh to commit many of the dwellers and I was able to weather the initial onslaught with a little bit of luck. Meanwhile the scribe began his magic and the reinforcements began to roll in, drawing Wolves away from the primary conflict.

Wolves 3It’s rude to hurl your dinner, please just kill and eat it like a normal giant Wolf would (My inner monologue for most of this game)

The Dark Marshal and the Goblin King then proceeded to use this as an opportunity to go on the counterattack, striking up and surrounding dwellers to bring them down whilst using magic to keep others locked down. A piercing striking Goblin King with Burly needed 2s to wound the defense 5 Dwellers with 6 attacks when trapped. Ouch! This chained with heroic combats saw several dwellers downed. The goblins in the centre had taken a bit of a beating and were broken in that time however, and the King / Marshal were drained of might.

Wolves4Bottom Right: A conveniently Dweller shaped hole in the midst of the Goblins. Forcing Josh to split his army made it very difficult for him to produce the shock and awe tactics he needed.

 By this point however Goblin reinforcements were swarming over the remaining objectives and the day was clearly carried. The surviving dwellers were buried under the remaining goblins whilst the Dark Marshal heroically delivered the coup de grace to end the game, fading out of existence beside the Wolfs corpse as he lost his last will point. Ultimately a bloody victory, but a comfortable one that I didn’t make tangible mistakes in and felt in control. As much as he likes to compete Josh was a top sport as usual and clearly still enjoying himself even when losing.

Final score: 19-3 

 


Game 2: Race to the Prize vs Nick Beattie (Iron Hills Dwarves)

Dain Ironfoot – War Boar
11 Iron Hills Dwarves 

Iron Hills Captain
11 Iron Hills Dwarves 

Iron Hills Captain – War Goat
6 Goat Riders

Dwarves1‘We’re on lads! Let’s give these bastards a good hammering!’

Race to the Prize is a more balanced version of Hold Ground. Nothing starts on the board but instead randomly deploys from any board edge, runs to the middle and seeks to capture the objective and the artifact atop it. I was playing against Nick Beattie, who as I mentioned in my previous blog, from everything I heard was quickly picking up the game with the benefit of his experience in other war gaming systems. As you’ll soon see, ‘quickly’ is a severe disservice to his ability.

Iron Hills if they can bunker up are a nightmare to dislodge, but I knew that I could most likely outflank them plus the fact they needed to move to the centre while being harassed and only having limited options to stop my reinforcements. The Iron Hills army rule meant that the dwarves could always arrive when and where they wanted to (a 2 could be pushed down to a 1, a 3 could be pushed up to a 4, a 4+ is effectively a 6) so I had no hope of looking to catch them out, but was prepared to spend as much might as necessary to make sure my army came on together, its strength is in numbers. I held a decent might advantage at 11 to 7, but this was mitigated by the Captains special rules to potentially copy my actions for free. Double monster gives me good tools to take out the goats with hurls and the Marshal could shut down Dain with magic for most of the game hopefully. With all this in mind I was reasonably confident I could pull out the win against a newcomer. Nick had never encountered many of the things in my army, including Ringwraiths, Shamans and flying monsters. It was only his 2nd large point’s game and something like his 8th game in total.

I began by deploying some of my smaller weaker warbands with less might, so that if necessary the big things could spend might to come on and protect them. The Scribe was my first warband and immediately rolled for reinforcements, which combined with the spreading of that warband resulted in my covering 44 inches of a board edge in which Nick could not deploy because he would be within 6 inches of one of my models. He did however deploy his goats towards the edge of that board edge. I responded with more goblins, he deployed infantry some distance away on the short board edge. The King, The Dark Marshal and Grinnah all spent might to appear in the face of the Goat Riders. Nick immediately realised his error in not deploying his force together and resolved to do everything to mitigate his losses.

Dwarves2‘Send in the Goats’ –Dain

The goats would not be able to outrun the fellbeast who could compel, charge one and then hurl or heroic combat, so he decided to commit them in to buy time for the dwarves to reach the centre and do as much damage as possible. My jaw then proceeded to hit the floor as he looked to block the flying fellbeast by using his models to prevent a space for it to land in the back line. This is a fairly advanced tactic, and most players pick it up after a long time playing where they’ve seen it been done before. This man was doing it despite having never even played against a model with fly before. I was later told in his 2nd game ever he’d dismounted in order to able to fit through a particular gap. This is something people playing the game for years don’t do.

The goats were fairly swiftly swarmed and brought down with a combination of magic, hurling and sheer numbers whilst the rest of the Goblins swarmed for the centre from the shortest possible distance from a table edge.

Dwarves3The horde swallows the goats up, leaving nary a trace behind

At this point I was very confident of taking away the win, but I also realised I had someone who would have a great mind for the game and was very open to learning. The rest of the game was in some respects almost a cooperative venture, with both of us openly talking from both sides of the fence what our tactics should be and what our opponent should expect and how to react to that. Nick would end up earning my best sports vote, despite his early losses he wholeheartedly threw himself for the rest of the game into discussing how he should be trying to mitigate his losses and recover with an upbeat and very perceptive attitude.

Dwarves4Dwarves are natural sprinters, very dangerous over short distances!

It was then a headlong march for the centre, with harassing goblins from behind and the mercenaries deploying near the centre blocking off the dwarves ensuring I would comfortably envelop it before Nick could get there. The artifact was snatched up and quickly put into the hands of the Goblin King.

Dwarves5The Goblin Apocalypse is upon us

The Dwarves formed their shield wall, gritted their teeth and began to grind relentlessly towards the objective. Iron Hills are incredibly hard to kill, even when completely surrounded, so a heavy extended melee broke out in the town square. The Marshal kept Dain out of the fight whilst I rolled a horrendous amount of reinforcements, using up the 40 odd spare goblins I had brought along, never anticipating I would use every single one of them.

Dwarves6I ended the game with more models than when I started. Not often you can say that.

The Dwarves eventually caved under the relentless pressure, not before bringing down the Dark Marshal. A very decisive win ultimately, but a most engaging and enjoyable game. I like helping people learn, and someone with a natural knack for it like Nick is very gratifying to watch. I think it’s fair to say, come this time next year, there will be another very dangerous competitor in the ranks, and I’ll be cheering for him. I’d love a rematch then.

Final Score: 21 – 3

 


Game 3: Breakthrough vs Tim Wraight (Double Mumakil)

Mumak1Amazing display board and theme, got my best army vote

Game 3 saw me matched up against Tim’s Mumaks. As I’d suspected, the big things were coming out in full force from him. The objective of Breakthrough is to run your models off the opposite edge, with points for how many you get off. I had far more than he did, but his were much faster, and much harder to stop. If they all died or got off before I could get models to the other side, I would be losing very hard. The Goblin King could shake off a trample, but nothing else in the list can. The only other tool I have for stopping them is using the Dark Marshal to control the commander of the beasts. I couldn’t also let them die too quickly because then the game would end again! Speed bumps is the name of the game.

Mumak2Full Speed Ahead!

Tim sensibly split the Mumaks so I couldn’t slam them into each other and also forced me to divide my forces. The Mercenaries deployed early in one of the far ruins in the hope that Tim would turn around and try to run them down, which would give me some very crucial time to move everything up. He didn’t bite, and continued to storm forward, which I think was the right decision. If he gets a mumak off and ends the game he still gains more points than I do. The Purple Mumak squared up against the Goblin King, who stood at the head of a cowering column of Goblins that all stood directly in 2 lines behind him. After some thinking Tim elects to veer away from the King, reasoning that he has a low chance to kill him and will probably be losing combats against him because of the fight values. I agree with this rationale, he wants to get off the board as swiftly as possible. However, I think he would have fared better drifting to the edge of the board than towards the centre, for reasons that will soon become apparent.

Mumak3Grinnah and friends breathe a sigh of relief

In the meantime, the Dark Marshal was forcing the Green Mumak into reverse parking every turn, heavily stalling its movement forward. Most of the crew dismounted with rappelling lines, since they would be able to actually move faster than the 4 inches forward it was gaining each turn. In the meantime both Grinnah on my right flank and Black Numenoreans in the centre were sprinting towards the other end of the board unimpeded. With the Green Mumak stalled, the Dark Marshal flew over and was able to reach the Purple Mumak as it had veered towards the centre.

Mumak5Did you invite it?

I was then able to successfully turn it around a turn away from the board edge into the hands of the King and his merry goblins, who promptly took 5 wounds off the beast in combat. It didn’t stampede, but I wasn’t too fussed as the compel had also granted me an extra turns grace before it reached the edge. I was fortunate enough to win the Heroic Move next turn and promptly dealt another 5 wounds to the Mumak, bringing the beast down.

Mumak6Legend says in Harad this manoeuvre is called ‘chucking a uey’

The Beastmaster was the only survivor of the falling damage, and was hunted down by the Goblin King. The Dark Marshal returned to the left flank to answer the encroaching Green Mumak.

Mumak7Abandon Ship!

The Mercenaries, Black Numenoreans and Grinnah’s contingent sat on the edge of the board, but I didn’t move them off it.  I was close to breaking, and I didn’t want for everything to run unnecessarily. Thus they all gathered on the board edge waiting for the final turn of the game. As the crew had predominantly dismounted, the remaining Goblins on that flank threw themselves into combat. The Dark Marshal came in to assist, yet again delivering the coup de grace to end the game as the models on the board edge left to safety.

Mumak9On Your Mark… Get Set…

The end result was another very clear victory in my favour, as I’d managed to prevent Tim from getting a single model off the board. It was dangerously close though, the Mumak’s had gotten perilously close to the board edge. Tim as always was a great sport.

Final Result: 22-3


Day 1 Closing Thoughts:

I’d run the group stage very successfully, dropping only 10 potential points over the course of the day for a final tournament score of 80 from a maximum of 90 points. I believe this had me sitting in first place at the halfway point in the tournament. I was obviously pleased with this, but I knew that the high seeding I now had would mean the gloves were off and I was in for some very challenging opponents tomorrow. Round 4 was to be on the top table against Lachlan Rigg, the man I knocked off the podium last year and the winner of Clash.  It would promise to be a most interesting game……

Come back next time for my coverage of day 2!